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When you go through what you’re told are the proper channels to get a problem solved — and it does nothing — is when any parent would come unglued.

It’s among the stories you hear when parents start homeschooling.  Any parent can understand how Jamie Rathburn of South Carolina felt. “I don’t regret standing up for my child one bit,” she explains. “I regret the way I did it.”

For a year, her son was the victim of physical and verbal bullying. She sent emails and had meetings with Greenbrier Elementary staff. Bullying is traumatic enough to kids without a school official having to segregate and follow a child throughout the day to keep from disciplining the bullies.

When school administrators isolated her son from his classmates, allegedly “for his protection,” she had enough. His teacher followed him everywhere, “including lunch and the playground,” Rathburn told CNN.

“I walked right in that school [and] told those children that bullying wasn’t okay. If they wanted to continue then I needed to talk to their mommas because the school wasn’t doing anything.”

She was immediately arrested on charges of “nonstudent interfering, disrupting or disturbing schools.”

“Ms. Rathburn did not enter the school and confront a specific bully or bullies, she yelled at and threatened dozens of eight and nine-year-old boys and girls because she didn’t know who she was looking for.”

The schools insist they train our children the way the state wants them trained. Parents are told public school is where the kids should go, period, end of story. It’s been long enough since school attendance became law that youngsters aren’t necessarily educated. It blows the minds of administrators to have kids withdrawn to home-school.

When an entity just isn’t listening and cannot comprehend something needs to be done about a problem, then an alternate direction is needed.

The ability for teachers to control or discipline their students has been eroded to the point where the bullies can run the asylum. School officials aren’t allowed to punish. Instead, the bullies are running free while the tormented child is being monitored.

“I do owe the staff, parents and students an apology — absolutely,” Rathburn says. “My actions were wrong whether it was for the right reason or not. Putting myself in their shoes, I can understand how anyone would be upset.”

Still, she had a valid point.

Did the parents of the bullies even know this was going on? Were they helpless to do anything? Absent father, abuse or drugs in the home? What does the other side of this look like, why are these kids being bullies? Nobody seems to want to know.

Jamie Rathburn knew who she was looking for, her son’s classmates, and she met with them. The ones who weren’t bullies knew which of their classmates were. The adults appear like they might have been hiding, deliberately not available while an angry mom was venting.


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